Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Wounded at Antietam: Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery Part 5

When Captain Joseph B. Campbell was wounded three times in quick succession during the Battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862, and had to relinquish command of Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery the command devolved on 2nd Lieutenant James Stewart.  In his official report following the battle Stewart noted the battery suffered 1 captain wounded, 3 sergeants, 4 corporals, 32 privates killed and wounded and 26 horses killed and 7 wounded.  He failed to include one wounded officer in his total however.

 In a letter written to John M. Gould on January 16, 1893 when Stewart was retired and living in Carthage, Ohio  he wrote: " About ten minutes after being placed in command (at Antietam) I was struck by a minie ball breaking my belt plate and knocking me down.  On getting up I found my sword belt broken in two.  The shock was terrible for some time, but I knew if I should allow it to be known that I was wounded that someone else would be sent to command the battery.  I suffered a great deal and had to use a Catheter for many a year and sometimes especially when I would catch cold the old pains will come back.  General Gibbon does not know to this day that I was wounded in that battle.  To when the battle was over, in place of looking over the field and making notes I had to lie flat on my back and obtain all the relief I possibly could until the Surgeon came and helped me with the pain."

What else can we say about a man who would receive a painful, grievous, wound in combat that he would suffer with the remainder of his life but consciously elect to not report the incident to a superior officer because he does not want to relinquish command.

James Stewart was born in Leith, Scotland, May 18, 1826.  His mother died in 1829 when he was three years old.  His father who was a builder and contractor followed her to the grave in 1841, leaving James an orphan when he was 15 years old.  Stewart  attended school in Leith and was a typesetter in the Queens Printing Office before leaving Scotland and immigrating to the United States in 1846. He was employed as a printer in New York City prior to his enlistment in the United States Army on October 29, 1851 when he was 25 years old.  At the date of his enlistment he stood about 5 feet six inches tall, had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.



Stewart's 1st duty station after enlisting was at Fort Columbus, Governor's Island New York, headquarters of the 4th U. S. Artillery.  In May 1852 acting 1st Sergeant Stewart, and 90 recruits made their way to Brownsville, Texas where Private Stewart was assigned to Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery beginning an association with the battery that would last for more than ten years and see Stewart rise in rank from private to 1st Lieutenant.

James Stewart would be appointed Corporal October 1, 1853, Sergeant on January 1, 1855 and 1st Sergeant on October 6, 1855.  Sometime in 1856 Stewart would marry Sabine Haas a daughter of farmer John Haas of Baden, Germany.  On August 29, 1856 he would reenlist for  2nd 5 year term with Battery B. In late November 1856 Battery B, which had been in Texas since the close of the Mexican War, would get orders to proceed to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

James Stewart, his wife and Battery B would spend the winter at Jefferson Barracks in St Louis, departing that city for Fort Leavenworth in March, 1857. On June 19 James Stewart, his growing family which now included a son also named James, and Battery B headed for Camp Floyd, Utah Territory, arriving there in the early summer of 1858.

When the Civil War started in 1861 James Stewart was still in Utah with Battery B which was now under the command of Captain John Gibbon.  By this time Stewart's family had grown to include two daughters born in Utah, Margaret born in 1859 and Sabine born in 1861.   On July 1, 1861 Stewart reenlisted for a 3rd 5 year term.  Eighteen days later on  July 19,  Battery B departed Camp Crittenden for the east.  By late October they were in Washington DC assigned to the Army of the Potomac.

On November 15, 1861 James Stewart was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant with Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery at the recommendation of Captain John Gibbon who referred to Stewart as being  "intelligent, faithful and honest, and without exception the best non-commissioned officer I have ever seen in the army."

Stewart would serve conspicuously with Battery B as a 2nd Lieutenant in numerous engagements with the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Virginia until appointed a 1st Lieutenant on July 3, 1863.  As previously noted he would assume command of Battery B at Antietam and command it throughout the vast majority of the remainder of the civil war.

At Gettysburg, where Stewart received his second war wound when he was struck in the thigh by a shell fragment, Battery B was engaged on both sides of the famous unfinished railroad cut in support of the 1st Corps on July 1 before retreating to East Cemetery Hill where they were engaged on July 2nd and 3rd. While the elements of the Union Army were retreating through town on July 1 and after getting his 3 guns out of harms way Stewart went back to look for his remaining three guns commanded by James Davidson.  Stewart ran into the rebels instead who yelled at him to surrender.  He noted "As I had not gone there for that purpose, I wheeled my horse  and started off as fast as he could go."

 Battery B was in the thick of the fighting at Gettysburg.  They lost 40 men killed and wounded and 57 horses killed or disabled during 3 days of combat. Rufus Dawes of the 6th Wisconsin, who knew Stewart well and served alongside him at both Antietam and Gettysburg noted in "Service with the 6th Wisconsin that "Stewart was as brave and efficient a man as ever fought on a field of battle."

1st Lieutenant James Stewart commanded Battery B during the Overland Campaign  and the Siege of Petersburg in 1864 and 1865.  He would be breveted Captain on August 1, 1864 for brave and meritorious conduct at Spotsylvania Courthouse and to Major on August 18 for action at Weldon Railroad.  He would be wounded a third time late in 1864 before Petersburg when his horse was shot under him and fell on his leg permanently injuring his ankle.

At the close of the Civil War  James Stewart would lead Battery B down Pennsylvania Avenue during the Grand Review May 23, 1865 before being transferred to Battery G 4th U. S. Artillery in September 1865 and being assigned to Fort Wayne, Detroit, Michigan.  James Stewart would continue to serve in the United States Army until his retirement in 1879.  To be continued...



Information in this article derived from sources including but not limited to:  U. S. Army Register of Enlistments, 2 articles written by James Stewart for MOLLUS, letters written by James Stewart & John Gibbon, U. S. Census Records, History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Ohio, The Cannoneer (photo).



Saturday, December 9, 2017

The Wounded at Antietam: Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery, Part 4

Thomas M. Clark was born at sea in about 1816.  He was a resident of of La Crosse, Wisconsin when  he enlisted as a private in Company B, 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry on May 22, 1861. He was detached to Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery June 7, 1862 and served with the battery at Antietam where he was wounded.  Clark remained with Battery B until June 15, 1864.  He was mustered out on June 30, 1864 at the expiration of service.  Private Clark's pension records indicate that after mustering out of the 2nd Wisconsin he enlisted in the 1st Connecticut Independent Artillery Battery on August 17, 1864 and served with that unit until June 11, 1865.

Thomas Clark got married in Columbia, Wisconsin on May 6, 1866.   Fifty-three year old Thomas Clark was living with his wife in La Crosse, when he was admitted to the Northwest Branch National Home for Disabled Soldiers in Milwaukee on October 3, 1869.  His was disabled by an injury to his head and right hand.  He died June 6, 1871 at the soldiers home from bleeding from the lungs.  He was interred in Wood National Cemetery which is adjacent to the National Home for Disabled Soldiers (now the VA)


                        Find A Grave Photo Nadeen Sobottka

Benjamin Franklin Noble was born March 1, 1838 in Erie, Pennsylvania the son of Adna Wilcox Noble and his second wife Hanna (Newton) Noble whom he married on December 29, 1828.  In 1850 the family was living in Millcreek Township, Erie County, Pennsylvania where Adna was a carpenter and joiner.  By 1860 22 year old Frank Noble was a farm laborer living in Rutland, Dane County,  Wisconsin.  On August 10, 1861 Noble enlisted in Company D, 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.  Frank was detached to Battery B from January 8, 1862 until January 1864.  His obituary notes he was wounded at Gainesville and Antietam.  He was discharged for disability September 30, 1864.  In 1866 Frank Noble moved to Oxford, Johnson County, Kansas where he farmed.  He married Sarah Ellen Hancock in 1868.  Frank and Sarah would have  2 sons and one daughter.  He was a charter member of the Franklin Post, Grand Army of the Republic, in Olathe.  Benjamin Franklin Noble was 65 when he died April 5, 1903.  He is buried in Pleasant Valley Cemetery, Oakland Park, Johnson County, Kansas.  Noble's headstone states he served with Battery B, 4th U. S. Artillery and Company D, 7th Wisconsin Infantry.

Benjamin's younger brother Andrew Jackson Noble served with Company G & C 19th Pennsylvania Cavalry.


                      Find A Grave Photo Silver Spark

Elias Burton Miller, the son of Bernard and Gelina (Butte) Miller was born October 17, 1835 in New York.  In 1850 the family lived in Arcadia, Wayne County, New York.  Burton age 14 was one of six children.  Burton was a resident of Berrien County, Michigan when he enlisted in Company G, 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry on July 12, 1861.  He was on detached service with Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery from May 1862 until December 1863.  Miller was wounded at Antietam.  On January 1, 1864 Private Miller transferred to the 10th Wisconsin Light Artillery.  He mustered out June 7, 1865.  On March 23, 1871 Elias married Delila (Stacy) Leslie  at St. Joseph, Michigan.  In 1880 Elias, Delila and her son from a previous marriage, Henry, were living with Elias's father Bernard in Lincoln, Michigan.  In 1900 Elias was still working as a day laborer.  He died December 26, 1903 in St. Joseph Michigan and is buried in the St. Joseph City Cemetery.

Joseph D. Grim the son of George Grim and his wife Mary (Correll) Grim was born September 5, 1838 in Ohio.  In 1850 and 1860 he lived in Jefferson, Owen County, Indiana.  On July 29, 1861 Joseph enlisted as a private in Company I, 19th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment.  He was detached to Battery B on November 1, 1861 and served with the battery until January 1863.  He was wounded in action at Antietam.   The Indiana Draft Registration for June 1863 noted Joseph had been discharged from the service.  On October 8, 1864 Joseph married Elmira E. Gard.  In 1870 they lived in Jefferson, Indiana however by 1880 the family, which now included three children, were residing in Salt River, Adair County, Missouri where Joseph was a farmer.  The 1900 and 1910 Census shows Joseph and Elmira living in Kirksville, Adair County, Missouri.  Joseph D. Grim died September 24, 1917 and is buried in Forest-Llewwllyn Cemetery in Kirksville.    Grim's headstone notes he served with Company I, 19th Indiana Veteran Volunteer Infantry.


                           Find A Grave Photo Chris Porche

John H. Fulton, the son of Thomas B. and Elizabeth G. Fulton was born April 3, 1843 in Quincy, Adams County, Illinois.  When John was three years old the family moved to Belmont, Lafayette County, Wisconsin.   Nineteen year old John H. Fulton was living in Belmont when he enlisted as a private in Company C, 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry on August 12, 1861.   He was detached to Battery B June 8, 1862.  He was wounded at Antietam while serving with Battery B.  Fulton was mustered out of the 7th Wisconsin on September 1, 1864.  On January 3, 1866 he married Delia A. Phillips.  The couple would have 7 children.  They lived in Belmont, Wisconsin until 1872 when they moved to a homestead near Scribner, Dodge County, Nebraska.  In 1879 John & Delia moved to Creighton, Nebraska.  John H. Fulton died on April 9, 1921 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

The Wounded at Antietam: Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery Part 3

Private Harvey Harvison Childs, the fourth of six children of Elijah and Sabrina (Atwood) Childs, was born August 16, 1840 in New York.  In 1840 the family lived in Massena, Saint Lawrence County, New York where Elijah was a farmer.  Harvey was living in Lindina, Juneau County, Wisconsin with his parents and 14 year old brother Selden in 1860.  He enlisted in Company A, 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry on May 15, 1861.  He was detached to serve with Battery B, where his younger brother Henry L. Childs also served, on June 7, 1862.  Private Childs received a gunshot wound to the right shoulder  at the Battle of Antietam and was discharged for disability on February 27, 1863.

On May 4, 1864 Harvey enlisted in Company E, 41st Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry which was organized at Milwaukee on June 8, 1864.  He was promoted to Captain June, 9, 1864.  The regiment  left Wisconsin for Memphis, Tennessee on June 15 where they were engaged in garrison duty, as railroad guards and on pickets duty.  The 41st Wisconsin was garrisoning Memphis with other federal troops on August 21, 1864 when Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest and his cavalry raided the town. The 41st Wisconsin, including Captain Childs,was mustered out at Camp Washburn when they disbanded the 100 day regiment on September 23, 1864.

On February 9, 1865 Harvey Childs was mustered into Company E, 49th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, a one year regiment.  On February 16 he was appointed Captain.  The regiment was sent to Missouri where Company E was employed as guards at Benton Barracks near St. Louis.  Captain Childs was mustered out of the 49th February 9, 1866 ending his military career.

By 1870 Harvey Childs and his wife Luthera (Atwood) Childs were living in Spring Creek, Johnson County, Nebraska where Harvey was a farmer.   They continued to live in Spring Creek through 1880 with their 9 year old son Frank.  By 1900 the Harvey's were living in McWilliams, Otoe County, Nebraska where Harvey was a coal and lumber merchant.  Harvey died December 21, 1905 and is buried in Grant Evergreen Cemetery, Nemaha County, Nebraska.




                             Find A Grave Photo by Roger Newby

Private Amos G. Burdick, a son of John and Catherine (Clarke) Burdick, was born October 30, 1839 in Darien, Genesee County, New York.  In 1850 Amos lived in Bennington, Wyoming County, New York with his parents and seven siblings.  In 1860 Amos was living in Milton, Rock County, Wisconsin where he was apprenticing as a wagon maker under Nathan Burdick.  On April 24, 1861 Amos enlisted in Company H, 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.  He was detached to serve with Battery B in May 1862.  He was wounded during the Battle of Antietam.  He was on detached service with Battery B until April 1863.  Amos died of disease at Milton, Wisconsin, in either March or April 1864.  He is buried in the Milton Cemetery, Rock County, Wisconsin.  Amos's older brother Albert served with the 22nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry from August 1862 until June 1865.

Private William Dickerson was born November 8, 1837 in Boone County, Indiana to parents Samuel and Elizabeth (Barnett) Dickerson.The 1850 Census found the family living in Washington, Brown County, Indiana.  At that time Samuel and Elizabeth had 5 sons.  William was the second youngest. In 1860 William and his older brother Samuel Franklin were farm laborers in Johnson County, Indiana.  William Dickerson mustered into Company H, 19th Indiana July 29, 1861.  He was detached to Battery B in March 1862.  Private Dickerson received a gunshot wound to the right thigh on September 17, 1862 at Antietam which made him unfit for service.  He was mustered out in March 1863.  On February 24, 1864 William married Nancy Ellen Paul.

In 1870 William was living in Taylor, Sullivan County, Missouri with his wife Nancy, daughter Laura and son William F. Dickerson.  In 1880 William was farming near Liberty Missouri.  He was still living in Missouri farming in 1900 but by 1906 he was homesteading near Liberal, Kansas.  William Dickerson died March 10, 1922.  He is buried in the Liberal Cemetery, Seward County, Kansas.  William Dickerson's brother Samuel Franklin served with Company H, 19th Indiana from July 29, 1861 until July 28, 1864.


  
                                Find A Grave Photo by Ronaca


Information in this post is obtained mostly from U. S. Census records, Regimental Rosters, Pension Indexes, Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, U. S. National Home for Disabled Volunteers records, Registers of Deaths of Volunteers, New York, Town Clerks Register of Men Who Served in the Civi War. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats,  and other Civil war related Records on Ancestry.com and Fold3.com.

Friday, November 3, 2017

The Wounded at Antietam: Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery Part 2

When Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery arrived in Washington D. C., in mid October 1861 their ranks were seriously depleted.  Men were not enlisting in the regular army as they preferred to enlist in volunteer regiments raised in their own state.  Captain John Gibbon therefore resorted to filling the ranks of the battery with volunteer soldiers he selected from the 2nd, 6th, and 7th Wisconsin, the 19th Indiana and the 23rd and 35th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiments.  Some of these men would be wounded in action alongside the regulars in the battery on September 17, 1862.  Here are some of their stories.

Addison Evans was born at Wirt, New York February 13, 1837.  He was the son of farmer Pliny Evans and Polly Gilbert.  On May 1, 1861 Evans enlisted at Cuba, New York in Company B, 23rd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, one of a number of 2 tear regiments being raised in New York.  He was detached to serve with Battery B in November 1861.  Private Evans received a severe flesh wound while serving with the battery at the Battle of Antietam.  He was in the hospital when the 23rd New York mustered out May 22, 1863.  On October 27, 1863 Addison married Eloisa H. Root in Washington D.C.  In 1870 Addison and Eloisa were living in Hamilton, Caldwell County, Missouri.  By 1880 Addison, Eloisa and their four children were living in  Quncy, Adams County, Illinois.  By 1888 the Evans family was living in Chicago where Addison was a merchant in a stockyard.  He died March 3, 1893, age 58, and is buried in Maple Lawn Cemetery, Bolivar, Allegany County New York.

                     
                            Find A Grave Photo AlleCattPaws

Farmer Charles Hathaway, who was born about 1840, enlisted as a private in Company G, 23rd New York Volunteer Infantry at Hornellsville, Steuben County, New York on May 9 1861. He served on detached service with Battery B at Antietam.  Charles was wounded during the battle and died of his wounds at the Smoketown Hospital north of Sharpsburg, Maryland on October 24, 1862.   Private Hathaway is buried at Antietam National Cemetery in grave #506 in the New York section.  

                           
                 Charles Hathaway Grave, Antietam National Cemetery

Private James C Clark, who was born about 1842 in Pennsylvania.  In 1860 he was living in Urbana, Steuben County, New York and was apprenticing as a blacksmith.  He enlisted in Company C, 35th New York Volunteer Infantry on May 15, 1861 at Watertown, New York.  He served on detached service with Battery B and was wounded at Antietam.  Clark was discharged for disability March, 11, 1863 at a convalescent camp.  On August 13, 1863 James enlisted in Company H, 18th New York cavalry.  On October 16, 1863 he was appointed sergeant.  Sergeant Clark mustered out with the company at Victoria, Texas May 31, 1866.  The 1880 Census shows James Clark living in Bath, Steuben County, New York.  Clarks pension files indicate he died on September 2, 1916 at Bath.

Private Robert McAlona, who was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, was a 20 years old resident of Redwood, Jefferson County, New York when he enlisted in Company I, 35th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment for 2 years on May 25, 1861. He stood 5' 10" tall and had grey eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion. He mustered in with the regiment on June 11, 1861.  Private McAlona was detached to serve with Battery B and was wounded at Antietam.  He was absent in the hospital when the 35th mustered out on June 5, 1863.  On October 10, 1863 McAlona enlisted in Company F, 20th New York Cavalry.  He was promoted to Corporal on November 10, 1863 and mustered out with the regiment July 31, 1865.

Private William I. Moore, the son of John H. and Elizabeth Moore was born about 1841 in New York. Both the 1850 and 1860 Census show him living in Elmira.  He enlisted and mustered in Company C, 35 th New York Volunteer Infantry on July 8, 1861.  He served with Battery B at Antietam and was wounded.  He deserted from the hospital January 25, 1863 but returned to duty March 20, 1863 and mustered out with the regiment June 5, 1863 at Elmira.  Moore died September 25, 1892 in Saginaw, Michigan.  He is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery.



                               Find A Grave Photo S. Schmidt

Private Joseph E. Morgan was born in 1839 on Prince Edward Island.  He was the son of Philip R. and Mary (James) Morgan.  In 1855 the family was living in Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts.  By 1860 Joseph was a harness maker in Junius, Seneca County, New York.  He enlisted in in Company I 35th New York Volunteer Infantry on May 20, 1861 at Watertown, New York.  On June 11, 1861 Joseph was mustered in as a sergeant in Company I.  Private Morgan received a gunshot wounded to the instep on September 17, 1862 while on detached service with Battery B.   On October 2, 1862 he was admitted to a hospital in Frederick, Maryland where he died on October 8, 1862.  His family took his remains home and buried him in the Cherry Hill Cemetery, in Gloucester, Massachusetts.


                       Find A Grave Photo John McNally

Private John G. Hodgedon was a resident of Merrimac, Sauk County, Wisconsin when he enlisted as a private in Company A, 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment on May 10, 1861.  He was detached to serve with Battery B on December 2, 1861.  He was wounded at Antietam and died of disease in a field hospital on December 2, 1862.  If he is buried at Antietam National Cemetery he is one of the unknowns.



Information in this post is obtained mostly from U. S. Census records, Regimental Rosters, Pension Indexes, Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, U. S. National Home for Disabled Volunteers records, Registers of Deaths of Volunteers, New York, Town Clerks Register of Men Who Served in the Civi War and other Civil war related Records on Ancestry.com and Fold3.com.

Thursday, November 2, 2017

The Wounded at Antietam: Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery

There were 31 reported wounded in the ranks of Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery in the September 17, 1862 Battle of Antietam including one captain, 2 sergeants, 3 corporals and 25 privates.  Several of the wounded would die not long after the battle but many would continue serving with the battery until discharged and after the war live, long productive lives.  This is their story.

Joseph Boyd Campbell commanded Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery at Antietam as Captain and Aide-de-Camp.  He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania November 26, 1836, the son of Henry Roe and Sidney Boyd Campbell.  His youth was spent in Pennsylvania and New Hampshire where his father was employed in civil engineering.  Campbell attended high school in Chelsea, Massachusetts until entering West Point in 1857 from which he graduated 22 of 34 in June 1861.  Upon graduation Campbell was assigned to Battery D, 2nd U. S. Artillery.  He was transferred to Battery B 4th U. S. in May 1862 when John Gibbon was promoted to Brigadier General of Volunteers.

                                       Joseph Boyd Campbell


Joseph Campbell was wounded at Antietam not long after bringing 4 guns of the battery to a position 2nd Lt. James Stewart already occupied with two guns just west of D. R. Millers's cornfield and a little south of Miller's barn and straw stacks.  Campbell's wounds, including one in the shoulder, were so severe that he would not hold field command in the civil war again.  After the  war Campbell continued to serve in the army, reaching the rank of Major before his untimely death from apoplexy on August 28, 1891.  He is buried at the West Point Cemetery. 

Two of Battery B's sergeants were wounded at Antietam, Robert Moore and William West. Sergeant Robert Moore was born in Tyrone, Ireland about 1829. The 26 year old was employed as a shoemaker in New York when he enlisted as a private in Battery B on June 7, 1855.  Moore stood 5' 10 1/2" tall.  He had grey eyes, sandy colored hair and a fair complexion.  Robert re-enlisted for a second 5 year term on May 11, 1860 while in Utah.  Sergeant Moore left the army on May 11, 1865 when his term of service expired.

Sergeant William West was born about 1825 in Bladen County, North Carolina. He was 5' 6 1/2" tall with blue eyes, sandy colored hair and a sandy colored complexion in 1846 when he enlisted in the army as a private on August 12, 1846 in Fayetteville, North Carolina.  West was an artificer with Battery A & D 4th U. S. Artillery until his discharge August 12, 1851 at Fort Mifflin. He reenlisted November 18, 1851 when he was 26 serving with both Battery D and B, 4th U. S. Artillery at different times.  He reenlisted in Battery B a third time on September 15, 1856 at First Brown, Texas and a fourth time July 1, 1861 at Fort Crittenden, Utah Territory.  West was wounded n the thigh on September 17, 1862 at the Battle of Antietam and was discharged for disability October 31, 1862 at Washington D. C.  In 1869 at the age of 39 West reenlisted in the army for another 5 years.  He was discharged March 30, 1874. Wet's death date is unknown however he is buried in Lawndale Union Cemetery, Logan County Illinois.

                Photo Jeanne Irene Bailey Schaub, Find A Grave

According to 2nd Lieutenant James Stewart, who commanded Battery B at the close of hostilities on September 17, 1862 three corporals serving with the battery were wounded at Antietam.  On page 42 of The Cannoneer Augustus Buell lists the wounded Corporals as _____ Willsey (Willse), _____ Benjamin,  and_____ Conners. The only one of the 3 that can be positively identified as being engaged at Antietam and wounded there is Corporal John Willse.  John C. Conners could be the Conners referred to by Buell however he appears to have been discharged July 3, 1862 at Fredericksburg, Virginia.  Corporal John M. Benjamin who had enlisted in Battery B June 3, 1857 also departed at the expiration of his service at Haymarket Station, Virginia June 3, 1862 so it is unlikely he would have been at Antietam either.

John Willse was born in New York City, New York about 1836 or 1837. John was a laborer when he enlisted as a private in Battery B, 4th U. S. Artillery in New York on June 2, 1855 when he was 18 years old.  Willse had brown hair, brown eyes, a dark complexion and stood 5 feet 6 inches tall.   He reenlisted April 7, 1860 while at Camp Floyd, Utah Territory for a 2nd 5 year term.  Willse reenlisted for 3 years on July 15, 1864 while at Petersburg, Virginia.  He reenlisted a 4th time  for three years while at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.  He was discharged from Battery B December 1, 1870 at Fort Riley, Kansas.   On  February 28, 1876 John enlisted as a private in Company A, 2nd U. S. Artillery at Fort McHenry, Maryland.  He was discharged at the expiration of his service February 22, 1881.  John Willse died December 21, 1899 and is buried in the United States Soldier's and Airmen's Home National Cemetery in Washington D.C. 

                               Photo GulfportBob Find A Grave
                                               

There were 25 privates who were wounded while serving with Battery B at Antietam.  Some of these soldiers served with the battery in the regular army others were on detached service from volunteer infantry regiments.  There story will follow in a subsequent post.






Sunday, September 24, 2017

The Dead of Antietam: Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery

Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery entered the battle of Antietam, with six Model 1857 Light 12 Pounder Gun-Howitzer smoothbore cannons and 100 cannoneers to man them.   They were engaged east of the D. R. Miller house and later west of the Hagerstown pike south of the D. R. Miller barn supporting John Gibbon's Iron Brigade as they advanced south along the Hagerstown Pike.




                              Engraving from "The Cannoneer"


Before the days fighting was over Battery B would loose 9 men killed in action and another 31 wounded.  The dead included 2 officers and 7 privates.  Three of the dead were regulars with Battery B, the other six were volunteers from Indiana, New York and Wisconsin on detached service with the battery.   This is the story of those brave cannoneers killed in action on September 17, 1862.

Sergeant Joseph Herzog was born in Colmar, France about 1827.  On May 19, 1855, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania he enlisted in Battery B 4th U. S. Artillery for 5 years.  His enlistment papers noted he was a tailor.  He served with the battery in Utah Territory and Nevada where he was wounded in the neck, while mounted as cavalry, in an engagement against Indians in Egan Canyon on August 11, 1860. Herzog would re-enlisted for a second five year term at Camp Floyd, Utah Territory March 19, 1860. At the time of his re-enlistment he was listed as 5 feet 5 1/4 inches tall with blue eyes, and sandy colored hair.  During the thick of the fighting along the Hagerstown Pike Sergeant Herzog was  severely wounded.    According to John Gibbon in "Personal Recollections of the Civil War" Herzog was taken to a field hospital in the rear where he took his own life.

Corporal John Brown was born in Bayern, Germany about 1826.  He was a farmer there before emigrating to the United States.  While in Louisville, Kentucky on March 26, 1858 he enlisted in Battery B for 5 years.  Brown was 5 feet 11 inches tall with hazel eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion.  He served with the battery in Utah Territory and Ruby Valley, Nevada, coming east along with the other regulars in the late summer and early fall of 1861.  Brown would be killed in action on September 17, 1862.

The third regular army soldier killed with Battery B at Antietam was private Henry P. Lyons.  He was born in Galway, Ireland about 1825.  When he enlisted in Detroit, Michigan on January 25, 1858 Lyons was a 23 year old laborer standing 5 feet 8 1/4 inches tall, with grey eyes, brown hair and a light complexion.  Lyons served with the battery in Utah, Ruby Valley, Nevada and Virginia prior to his being killed in action on September 17, 1862.

It is highly likely these three regular army soldiers were buried on the field where they fell after the fighting was over at Antietam.  If they were disinterred in 1866 and moved to Antietam National Cemetery they are among the over 1,800 soldiers interred there known only to God.

Six privates on detached service from volunteer infantry regiments would loose their lives along side the regulars at the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862.  Four of these men were with the Sixth Wisconsin, one with the 19th Indiana and one with the 23rd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment.

Private John R. Anderson enlisted in Company C, 19th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment in Indianapolis on December 28, 1861.  He was 22 years old.  Anderson was mustered into federal service on January 1, 1862 and detached to Battery B in May 1862,  Anderson was killed in action on September 17 and later buried on the battlefield.  His remains were disinterred from the battlefield and reinterred in Antietam National Cemetery on November 10, 1866 where he now rests in grave #3447 in the Indiana Section.


                                       
                                      Private J. R. Anderson

Henry Brown was born in Chemung County, New York about 1841.  On May 6, 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company F, 23rd New York Volunteer Infantry for two years at Elmira.  Brown was 20 years old.  He would be mustered into federal service on May 16, 1861.  Henry Brown was serving on detached service with Battery B when he was killed September 17, 1862.

Twenty year old Sylvester Fort was living in Honey Creek, Sauk County, Wisconsin when he and his 22 year old brother Isaac enlisted in Company A, 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry on May 10, 1861.  Isaac and Sylvester, sons of Arthur Fort and his wife Julia were born in Chemung County, New York. On June 7, 1862 he was attached to Battery B.  He was killed in action at Antietam September 17, 1862.  Sylvester's brother Isaac would serve throughout the civil war with the 6th Wisconsin.  He would be mustered out with the regiment on July 14, 1865 and not die until 1923.

Martin McCandra (also spelled McCandron, McCandria, McCandraw) was from Stillwater, Minnesota.   He mustered in to Company B, 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry  on June 10, 1861.  He was detached to Battery B June 7, 1862.  He was killed at Antietam September 17, 1862 and buried on the field.  He was removed from the battlefield in 1866 and reinterred in Antietam National Cemetery on November 9, 1866 in grave #3348 in the Wisconsin Section.


                                  Private Martin McCandra


Private Hiram Kell Whitaker was born April 13, 1841 in Indiana, the 7th child of Joseph and Mary Boswell Whitaker.  He was living in Royalton Township, Berrien County, Michigan when he mustered into Company G, 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry on June 11, 1861.  Whitaker was 20 years old.  He was on detached service with Battery B when he was killed in action on September 17, 1862.  Hiram Whitaker had 2 brothers Joseph (1846-1864) and William (1834-1863) who served in the civil war.  Both reportedly died while prisoners of war.   The cenotaph pictured below was erected in Baintertown Cemetery, New Paris, Elkhart County, Indiana in memory of Hiram and his younger brother Joseph.




                                Find A Grave Photo L. Litchfield

Smith Young was a resident of Berrien County, Michigan when he enlisted in Company G, 6th Wisconsin Infantry on June 11, 1861.  He was detached to serve with Battery B on September 12, 1862 and killed in action on September 17.

Henry Brown, Sylvester Fort, Hiram Whitaker and Smith Young were probably all buried on the Antietam battlefield after the fighting ceased.  If they were removed to Antietam National Cemetery in 1866 they are among the unknown.

The battle of Antietam remains the single bloodiest day in all American military history, where in 12 hours of fighting over 23,000 Americans were listed as killed, wounded, captured or missing.  Battery B's casualties on that fateful September day, 155 years ago, rank as the third highest of any regular artillery battery in combat during the war.  May they all rest in peace on hallowed ground.

Information comes from Indiana, New York and Wisconsin Regimental Rosters, U. S. Census Records, U. S. Army Register of Enlistments, "The Utah Expedition", James Stewart, "The Cannoneer", Augustus C. Buell, "Personal Recollections of the Civil War", John Gibbon.






Monday, July 17, 2017

155 Years Later: On Hallowed Ground Honoring the men who Fought Here.

There is no doubt the land along the banks of Antietam Creek in Washington County, Maryland is hallowed ground to the ancestors of the men who wore both the blue and the gray.   More men were casualties here on that fateful day in September 1862 than in any other single day engagement in American military history.  Over 23,110 were listed as killed, wounded, missing or captured after more than 12 hours of fighting.

The battle started at dawn in farmer D. R. Miller's cornfield.



It ended at dark about 3 miles south of there on the hills above the west bank of Antietam Creek near the now famous Burnside Bridge.





This past weekend living historians from North Carolina and elsewhere came to Antietam National Battlefield to honor their ancestors and fellow Americans who fought here.  They conducted infantry, marching, deployment and small arms firing demonstrations representing the 28th, 18th and 11th North Carolina.


                              Marching According to Hardee's Tactics



                                         Firing by Company




               Calvert Arms Fife and Drum Corps joined them to play martial music

The living historians did a great job presenting programs for Antietam's visitors.  They marched to the Bloody Lane to fire a volley and later placed a wreath at Confederate Brigadier General Lawrence O' Bryan Branch's mortuary cannon on Branch Ave.  Calvert Arms Fife and Drum played music in Sharpsburg's town square on Saturday evening.  These programs are a great way to learn from history and also to honor the brave men who fought on these fields originally settled by pacifist German Baptist Brethren farmers.